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Commander
External frame for the backcountry
HUNT TYPES
Big Game
AVAILABLE COLORS / PATTERNS
Briar
Price
Qty
You're feeling good after your successful hunt... but now you've got to get all that meat back to camp. Bring along the reliable Commander Freighter Frame to haul your meat from one place to the next. The Commander comes equipped with a unique lashing system to secure your meat. With as much weight as you'll be carrying, padded waist belt and shoulder straps are a must. There are pockets for your flash light and knife, as well as a holder for your shooting stix on the lashing straps. If you want to carry even more gear, check our Commander Pack Bag!

View the Sportsman's News Product Review of the Commander

View the Commander Frame Product Review at Pocket Ranger Blog
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Features
  • Lashing system secures meat for long hauls
  • Includes three extension lashing straps for extra large loads
  • Freighter shelf supports heavy loads
  • Aluminum frame
  • Shooting sticks holder, knife and flashlight pocket
  • Adjustable shoulder harness
  • Adjustable torso range allows you to customize the pack to comfortably haul heavy loads
  • Torso range 17" – 23"
  • Padded waist belt and shoulder straps
  • Waist belt can accommodate clip-style holsters so you can securely carry a hand gun
  • Mesh back band for better ventilation
  • Pack bag not included
Specs
  • Weight: 5 lbs. 2 oz.
  • Torso Range: 17" to 23"
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Waist Belts: Standard Fits Waist 26" to 40" / X-Large Fits 40"+
Product Number
ItemProduct Number
Commander3699998
Customer Reviews
The Commander has been rated 141 times.
4.5 out of 5 stars
Comfortable

Back pack in caribou hunt held up well very comfortable the support is a must I herniated a disc previously so really need to take care of my back. This did fine

Decent hauler, but not one for serious excursions

A decently solid load hauler for the price that I am using for training. I pack a 50lb bag of gravel, and it manages it OK. Shoulder straps like to slowly loosen. Has a billion cotter pins that are annoying and only macro-adjustable. No shoulder load lifters, hip load adjustment straps are really weird when tightened (the hip belt itself is great). Lacks the features, comfort, and versatility of my hunting pack - BUT - costs 80% less. If you’re going backcountry and are going to live in your pack, I would personally get spendy on a great pack. This one works for more routine/shorter duration hauls. I wouldn’t want to put my 90lb spike camp (w/water) in it and hike a steep grade.

High quality, inexpensive, portable comms platform

My application for this pack is somewhat unique: to support my HFpack rig (man-portable shortwave amateur radio), in situations when I want to wear an antenna and/or hike further with my gear. I was considering a surplus ALICE frame, but opted for the convenience of something that includes straps and a big shelf. I’m impressed with the quality.

Thais is my first experience with an external frame pack. As someone who sweats a lot, I really appreciate the ventilation. I was worried about the horizontal supports causing back pain, but the shape of the frame and the way it bears weight makes it a non-issue. At 5’8” and 220 lbs (38-40” pant size), I was also unnecessarily concerned about the fit. The waist and sternum straps would accommodate someone much larger than myself, but the pack might be unwieldy for someone shorter or very thin. Alps sells a version of this bag with XL straps, which would've been way too big on me.

The pack is surprisingly light, considering how much load it’ll handle—more than my personal fitness will. There’s no shortage of ways to strap in my current bag containing the transceiver and LFP battery, additional battery/solar hardware, a folding stool (or two and a table, to picnic with the wife), and as many field antennas as I care to lug around. I’m only limited by what’s convenient to drag into the field.

On that note, I also intend to throw my bulky quadcopter hard case on the frame the next time we shoot video away from the car. No more grime on the case’s wheels, no more straining my shoulders carrying it over grass and gravel.

I attached a 3/8” antenna mount to one of the vertical frame members. Hopefully the leverage of 7-14’ and 1-2 lbs of vertical extension, depending on the coil on whip combination, won’t fatigue the aluminum. Time will tell.

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